Spring 2010 Driven Toward Success

Rick Elbaz, owner of Car Kitool in Las Vegas, is taking his latest success to an all-new level: retailers.

Elbaz isn’t new to the world of specialty retail. Far from it. He has retail experience in just about every category you can imagine—toys, candles, massagers, aromatherapy products, cosmetics—and has been in just as many malls, in a number of states: California, Utah, Washington, and nearly every mall in Las Vegas. “It’s what I know best,” Elbaz says.

So last January, when Elbaz added two new products to his cell phone accessory cart, Cellular Planet, in Fashion Show, a shopping center in Las Vegas, and saw his sales suddenly skyrocket, he knew right away this was only the beginning of a much bigger success story.

Past successes

But let’s back up just a bit. Three years ago, Elbaz began selling products emblazoned with Swarovski crystals, mostly shock-resistant cell phone cases, but there were other items, as well, such as pens, business card holders and license plate frames. In addition to the 20 designs of Swarovski crystal cell phone cases he carried (soon to be 50), he also offered plain shock-resistant cases in a variety of colors, both styles focusing on the iPhone and Blackberry models on the market. While the less-expensive plain cases, retailing for $20, had a much greater turnaround, the crystals provided an undeniable drawing power, their colors and sparkle catching customers’ eyes and pulling them over to the unit. And when they did sell, sometimes in multiples, at a retail of $300 and a wholesale of $65, the profits were just as colorful.

For three years, business at Cellular Planet was strong and steady. And then in the beginning of 2010, sales went off the charts. The reason? The introduction of the Car Kitool Original 1.0 and the Car Kitool Emergency Charger 1.0. The result was a cash register rarely at rest.

On the heels of this astounding success, Elbaz decided to take his concept to the next level: manufacturing and wholesaling the products to retailers across the country. The concept, Elbaz says, has the ability to drive sales—up to $75,000 a month.

Cultivating Car Kitool success

The Car Kitool Original 1.0 packs quite a technological punch. When plugged into a car’s cigarette lighter, with the radio on, it becomes a cell phone holder, charger and music player all at the same time. It works with any cell phone (an additional adapter is required if a customer’s cell phone doesn’t use a 3.5 millimeter headset jack), as well as iPod, in any car, and because installation is so simple, the device can easily be transferred to another car. Another plus: the mark-up. Retailers pay a wholesale price of $18, and customers pay a retail of $99.

The best thing, though, says Elbaz, is when customers place their cell phone in the Car Kitool Original 1.0, they are hands-free, an important requirement in many states today. (According to the Governors Highway Safety Association in Washington D.C., there is a handheld cell phone ban in six states: California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Washington, as well as the District of Columbia.)

Not only does it charge the phone in the holder, the Car Kitool Original 1.0 has a USB port on its side, allowing users to charge other appliances, such as another phone, a digital camera, or a GPS, while still charging their own iPhone or iPod.

Test drive

As a music player, once an iPhone or iPod is placed in the holder, the radio turns off in two seconds, and the selected music comes through the speakers of the car. When a call comes in, the music automatically fades out. As for other background noise, the Car Kitool built-in microphone scans it out, says Elbaz.

And with its flexible arm, called the FlexPod, if the cell phone is being used primarily as a GPS, or to play movies, the Car Kitool Original 1.0 can be tilted to the side for a wide screen view, or virtually any angle for that matter.

There are also two emergency chargers in the Car Kitool line, the electrically powered 1.0 (wholesales for $18 and retails between $70-$120) and the solar powered 2.0 (wholesales for $24 and retails between $99-$150). Emergency chargers are equipped with three hours of charging time and have lights to keep users posted on the time left. “When you have two lights on, you have two hours left and one light on, one hour left, and so on. It takes 45 minutes to fully charge an average cell phone,” says Elbaz. And last but not least, one of the most attractive features of the emergency chargers, other than rescuing cell phone users when their battery goes dead, is their small, convenient size, able to even fit inside a pocket or purse.

Combining these two products in a sale is key, what Elbaz refers to as selling a bundle, and to accomplish this, he offers customers an incentive. When customers buy a Car Kitool Original 1.0 and an Emergency Charger 1.0 or 2.0, they receive a shock-resistant case and screen protector for free. Car Kitool offers two different kinds of screen protectors, one with a reflective surface that serves as a mirror. “Women think this is really cool,” says Elbaz. The other has a focus on reducing glare and smudges such as fingerprints. Both protectors, designed for iPhones, promise simple installation with no bubbles.

The magic of demo

The products are important, there’s no doubt. But what sells the Car Kitool is the demonstration system, says Elbaz. For the Car Kitool demo to be effective, retailers need a demo box that has a receiver with two speakers. This demo box, supplied by Car Kitool, performs the same function as a cigarette lighter in a car.

The Car Kitool Original 1.0 demonstration takes a total of three minutes. Demonstrators use customers’ own cell phones, showing them the ease of making a call, playing music and using a GPS, while simultaneously charging their phone and an additional one. Retailers conduct actual phone calls to show customers the clarity of hands-free talking. The demo resembles a magic show, as demonstrators slip the customer’s cell phone into the Original 1.0 and say, “One, two, three …,” and then, Poof!, customers hear their own music over the speakers.

Once the Original 1.0 demonstration has concluded, the retailer moves on to show how the emergency charger works. And after that? The shock-resistant cases. “We slam our iPhone,” says Elbaz, who recommends retailers have a working iPhone on the cart for these demonstrations, or an iTouch, a cheaper version. Shock-resistant cases are rubberized and reinforced with hard plastic to ensure durability, providing strong protection against scratches.

The bottom line: “If you just put out the items… you’re not going to get the results,” says Elbaz.

Start your engines

Retailers deciding to sign on with Car Kitool have two options. The first is to add Car Kitool products to their current assortment of cell phone accessories. In this scenario, start-up costs hover around $5,000.

The second is by setting up a Car Kitool concept cart, retailing Car Kitool Original 1.0′s, Car Kitool Emergency Chargers 1.0 and 2.0, Car Kitool Shock-Resistant Cases, Car Kitool Screen Protectors and Car Kitool Headsets. In this scenario, start-up costs average $20,000, including the demo box. Demo boxes purchased on their own cost between $300-$500, and can be custom-made to color and size specifications.

Full support and training is offered to retailers regardless of the option they choose. Training at their Las Vegas headquarters is free of charge. If on-site training is preferred, there is a fee that varies depending on the location. For retailers who simply want to learn better sales techniques, such as effective demo speeches, “We could even do a phone training,” says Elbaz.

Elbaz assists retailers with site selection, as well. Due to his prior specialty retail experience, he has worked with many shopping center developers, including Westfield and General Growth Properties, Inc. Car Kitool products work well in just about any shopping center and demographic, says Elbaz. However, tourist areas, airports, and in general, busy malls do especially well, because Car Kitool products service the customer on-the-go who doesn’t have enough time to charge his or her phone, or isn’t even home enough to do so.

But, as Elbaz is quick to point out, with features enabling users to play their own music in their car, and protectors and cases for those who simply want to protect their phone—there’s something for the whole family.

As for merchandising guidelines on the RMUs themselves, Elbaz suggests retailers have two prominently placed plasma screens that show the Car Kitool products in use, one on each side of the cart, to grab the attention of those passing through the common area. One screen is also an option, or even none, if a retailer doesn’t have enough money in his budget. In this case, Elbaz offers “a layout with a (graphic) sphere design in the middle (of the unit) and slat walls on the side,” he says.

With or without plasma screens, the cart should be simple and easy to scan. If selling Swarovski crystals, retailers need glass display cases that can be locked up, due to their pricepoints.

But perhaps the best measure of support is the fact that the company stands behind all of its products. Each and every one comes with a one-year warranty and a toll-free number for customers and retailers to use. “We offer a one-year warranty on the crystals too. Every time you sell one of the cases, customers automatically ask, ‘How much is it?,’ and the next question is always, ‘What happens if a crystal falls off?’,” says Elbaz. “If customers don’t live in the area, they can send us the case and we will repair it and send it back,” he adds. Customers are encouraged to keep their receipt for this reason.

Unveiling the future

As this article goes to press, Elbaz finalizes the details of all he aims to accomplish. For starters, he would like to combine the Car Kitool Original 1.0 and Emergency Charger into one kit, to sell as a set, and introduce additional Car Kitool Original sets. The point is: If there’s a problem without a solution, or a way to make it better, Elbaz is working on it.

“Car Kitool has opened my eyes to a bigger vision,” Elbaz says, “I have huge goals and I intend to fulfill them.”

Mouse over images below to view.

Emily Lambert

Lambert, a senior writer for SRR, resides in Philadelphia. She can be reached at .

View all articles by Emily Lambert →

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Company Website: CarKitool.com

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Rick Elbaz, owner of Car Kitool in Las Vegas, is taking his latest success to an all-new level: retailers.

Elbaz isn’t new to the world of specialty retail. Far from it. He has retail experience in just about every category you can imagine—toys, candles, massagers, aromatherapy products, cosmetics—and has been in just as many malls, in a number of states: California, Utah, Washington, and nearly every mall in Las Vegas. “It’s what I know best,” Elbaz says.

So last January, when Elbaz added two new products to his cell phone accessory cart, Cellular Planet, in Fashion Show, a shopping center in Las Vegas, and saw his sales suddenly skyrocket, he knew right away this was only the beginning of a much bigger success story.

Past successes

But let’s back up just a bit. Three years ago, Elbaz began selling products emblazoned with Swarovski crystals, mostly shock-resistant cell phone cases, but there were other items, as well, such as pens, business card holders and license plate frames. In addition to the 20 designs of Swarovski crystal cell phone cases he carried (soon to be 50), he also offered plain shock-resistant cases in a variety of colors, both styles focusing on the iPhone and Blackberry models on the market. While the less-expensive plain cases, retailing for $20, had a much greater turnaround, the crystals provided an undeniable drawing power, their colors and sparkle catching customers’ eyes and pulling them over to the unit. And when they did sell, sometimes in multiples, at a retail of $300 and a wholesale of $65, the profits were just as colorful.

For three years, business at Cellular Planet was strong and steady. And then in the beginning of 2010, sales went off the charts. The reason? The introduction of the Car Kitool Original 1.0 and the Car Kitool Emergency Charger 1.0. The result was a cash register rarely at rest.

On the heels of this astounding success, Elbaz decided to take his concept to the next level: manufacturing and wholesaling the products to retailers across the country. The concept, Elbaz says, has the ability to drive sales—up to $75,000 a month.

Cultivating Car Kitool success

The Car Kitool Original 1.0 packs quite a technological punch. When plugged into a car’s cigarette lighter, with the radio on, it becomes a cell phone holder, charger and music player all at the same time. It works with any cell phone (an additional adapter is required if a customer’s cell phone doesn’t use a 3.5 millimeter headset jack), as well as iPod, in any car, and because installation is so simple, the device can easily be transferred to another car. Another plus: the mark-up. Retailers pay a wholesale price of $18, and customers pay a retail of $99.

The best thing, though, says Elbaz, is when customers place their cell phone in the Car Kitool Original 1.0, they are hands-free, an important requirement in many states today. (According to the Governors Highway Safety Association in Washington D.C., there is a handheld cell phone ban in six states: California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Washington, as well as the District of Columbia.)

Not only does it charge the phone in the holder, the Car Kitool Original 1.0 has a USB port on its side, allowing users to charge other appliances, such as another phone, a digital camera, or a GPS, while still charging their own iPhone or iPod.

Test drive

As a music player, once an iPhone or iPod is placed in the holder, the radio turns off in two seconds, and the selected music comes through the speakers of the car. When a call comes in, the music automatically fades out. As for other background noise, the Car Kitool built-in microphone scans it out, says Elbaz.

And with its flexible arm, called the FlexPod, if the cell phone is being used primarily as a GPS, or to play movies, the Car Kitool Original 1.0 can be tilted to the side for a wide screen view, or virtually any angle for that matter.

There are also two emergency chargers in the Car Kitool line, the electrically powered 1.0 (wholesales for $18 and retails between $70-$120) and the solar powered 2.0 (wholesales for $24 and retails between $99-$150). Emergency chargers are equipped with three hours of charging time and have lights to keep users posted on the time left. “When you have two lights on, you have two hours left and one light on, one hour left, and so on. It takes 45 minutes to fully charge an average cell phone,” says Elbaz. And last but not least, one of the most attractive features of the emergency chargers, other than rescuing cell phone users when their battery goes dead, is their small, convenient size, able to even fit inside a pocket or purse.

Combining these two products in a sale is key, what Elbaz refers to as selling a bundle, and to accomplish this, he offers customers an incentive. When customers buy a Car Kitool Original 1.0 and an Emergency Charger 1.0 or 2.0, they receive a shock-resistant case and screen protector for free. Car Kitool offers two different kinds of screen protectors, one with a reflective surface that serves as a mirror. “Women think this is really cool,” says Elbaz. The other has a focus on reducing glare and smudges such as fingerprints. Both protectors, designed for iPhones, promise simple installation with no bubbles.

The magic of demo

The products are important, there’s no doubt. But what sells the Car Kitool is the demonstration system, says Elbaz. For the Car Kitool demo to be effective, retailers need a demo box that has a receiver with two speakers. This demo box, supplied by Car Kitool, performs the same function as a cigarette lighter in a car.

The Car Kitool Original 1.0 demonstration takes a total of three minutes. Demonstrators use customers’ own cell phones, showing them the ease of making a call, playing music and using a GPS, while simultaneously charging their phone and an additional one. Retailers conduct actual phone calls to show customers the clarity of hands-free talking. The demo resembles a magic show, as demonstrators slip the customer’s cell phone into the Original 1.0 and say, “One, two, three …,” and then, Poof!, customers hear their own music over the speakers.

Once the Original 1.0 demonstration has concluded, the retailer moves on to show how the emergency charger works. And after that? The shock-resistant cases. “We slam our iPhone,” says Elbaz, who recommends retailers have a working iPhone on the cart for these demonstrations, or an iTouch, a cheaper version. Shock-resistant cases are rubberized and reinforced with hard plastic to ensure durability, providing strong protection against scratches.

The bottom line: “If you just put out the items… you’re not going to get the results,” says Elbaz.

Start your engines

Retailers deciding to sign on with Car Kitool have two options. The first is to add Car Kitool products to their current assortment of cell phone accessories. In this scenario, start-up costs hover around $5,000.

The second is by setting up a Car Kitool concept cart, retailing Car Kitool Original 1.0′s, Car Kitool Emergency Chargers 1.0 and 2.0, Car Kitool Shock-Resistant Cases, Car Kitool Screen Protectors and Car Kitool Headsets. In this scenario, start-up costs average $20,000, including the demo box. Demo boxes purchased on their own cost between $300-$500, and can be custom-made to color and size specifications.

Full support and training is offered to retailers regardless of the option they choose. Training at their Las Vegas headquarters is free of charge. If on-site training is preferred, there is a fee that varies depending on the location. For retailers who simply want to learn better sales techniques, such as effective demo speeches, “We could even do a phone training,” says Elbaz.

Elbaz assists retailers with site selection, as well. Due to his prior specialty retail experience, he has worked with many shopping center developers, including Westfield and General Growth Properties, Inc. Car Kitool products work well in just about any shopping center and demographic, says Elbaz. However, tourist areas, airports, and in general, busy malls do especially well, because Car Kitool products service the customer on-the-go who doesn’t have enough time to charge his or her phone, or isn’t even home enough to do so.

But, as Elbaz is quick to point out, with features enabling users to play their own music in their car, and protectors and cases for those who simply want to protect their phone—there’s something for the whole family.

As for merchandising guidelines on the RMUs themselves, Elbaz suggests retailers have two prominently placed plasma screens that show the Car Kitool products in use, one on each side of the cart, to grab the attention of those passing through the common area. One screen is also an option, or even none, if a retailer doesn’t have enough money in his budget. In this case, Elbaz offers “a layout with a (graphic) sphere design in the middle (of the unit) and slat walls on the side,” he says.

With or without plasma screens, the cart should be simple and easy to scan. If selling Swarovski crystals, retailers need glass display cases that can be locked up, due to their pricepoints.

But perhaps the best measure of support is the fact that the company stands behind all of its products. Each and every one comes with a one-year warranty and a toll-free number for customers and retailers to use. “We offer a one-year warranty on the crystals too. Every time you sell one of the cases, customers automatically ask, ‘How much is it?,’ and the next question is always, ‘What happens if a crystal falls off?’,” says Elbaz. “If customers don’t live in the area, they can send us the case and we will repair it and send it back,” he adds. Customers are encouraged to keep their receipt for this reason.

Unveiling the future

As this article goes to press, Elbaz finalizes the details of all he aims to accomplish. For starters, he would like to combine the Car Kitool Original 1.0 and Emergency Charger into one kit, to sell as a set, and introduce additional Car Kitool Original sets. The point is: If there’s a problem without a solution, or a way to make it better, Elbaz is working on it.

“Car Kitool has opened my eyes to a bigger vision,” Elbaz says, “I have huge goals and I intend to fulfill them.”

Mouse over images below to view.

Rick Elbaz, owner of Car Kitool in Las Vegas, is taking his latest success to an all-new level: retailers. Elbaz isn’t new to the world of specialty retail. Far from it. He has retail experience in just about every category you can imagine—toys, candles, massagers, aromatherapy products, cosmetics—and has been in just as many malls, in a number of states: California, Utah, Washington, and nearly every mall in Las Vegas. “It’s what I know best,” Elbaz says. So last January, when Elbaz added two new products to his cell phone accessory cart, Cellular Planet, in Fashion Show, a shopping center in Las Vegas, and saw his sales suddenly skyrocket, he knew right away this was only the beginning of a much bigger success story. Past successes But let’s back up just a bit. Three years ago, Elbaz began selling products emblazoned with Swarovski crystals, mostly shock-resistant cell phone cases, but there were other items, as well, such as pens, business card holders and license plate frames. In addition to the 20 designs of Swarovski crystal cell phone cases he carried (soon to be 50), he also offered plain shock-resistant cases in a variety of colors, both styles focusing on the iPhone and Blackberry models on the market. While the less-expensive plain cases, retailing for $20, had a much greater turnaround, the crystals provided an undeniable drawing power, their colors and sparkle catching customers’ eyes and pulling them over to the unit. And when they did sell, sometimes in multiples, at a retail of $300 and a wholesale of $65, the profits were just as colorful. For three years, business at Cellular Planet was strong and steady. And then in the beginning of 2010, sales went off the charts. The reason? The introduction of the Car Kitool Original 1.0 and the Car Kitool Emergency Charger 1.0. The result was a cash register rarely at rest. On the heels of this astounding success, Elbaz decided to take his concept to the next level: manufacturing and wholesaling the products to retailers across the country. The concept, Elbaz says, has the ability to drive sales—up to $75,000 a month. Cultivating Car Kitool success The Car Kitool Original 1.0 packs quite a technological punch. When plugged into a car’s cigarette lighter, with the radio on, it becomes a cell phone holder, charger and music player all at the same time. It works with any cell phone (an additional adapter is required if a customer’s cell phone doesn’t use a 3.5 millimeter headset jack), as well as iPod, in any car, and because installation is so simple, the device can easily be transferred to another car. Another plus: the mark-up. Retailers pay a wholesale price of $18, and customers pay a retail of $99. The best thing, though, says Elbaz, is when customers place their cell phone in the Car Kitool Original 1.0, they are hands-free, an important requirement in many states today. (According to the Governors Highway Safety Association in Washington D.C., there is a handheld cell phone ban in six states: California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Washington, as well as the District of Columbia.) Not only does it charge the phone in the holder, the Car Kitool Original 1.0 has a USB port on its side, allowing users to charge other appliances, such as another phone, a digital camera, or a GPS, while still charging their own iPhone or iPod. Test drive As a music player, once an iPhone or iPod is placed in the holder, the radio turns off in two seconds, and the selected music comes through the speakers of the car. When a call comes in, the music automatically fades out. As for other background noise, the Car Kitool built-in microphone scans it out, says Elbaz. And with its flexible arm, called the FlexPod, if the cell phone is being used primarily as a GPS, or to play movies, the Car Kitool Original 1.0 can be tilted to the side for a wide screen view, or virtually any angle for that matter. There are also two emergency chargers in the Car Kitool line, the electrically powered 1.0 (wholesales for $18 and retails between $70-$120) and the solar powered 2.0 (wholesales for $24 and retails between $99-$150). Emergency chargers are equipped with three hours of charging time and have lights to keep users posted on the time left. “When you have two lights on, you have two hours left and one light on, one hour left, and so on. It takes 45 minutes to fully charge an average cell phone,” says Elbaz. And last but not least, one of the most attractive features of the emergency chargers, other than rescuing cell phone users when their battery goes dead, is their small, convenient size, able to even fit inside a pocket or purse. Combining these two products in a sale is key, what Elbaz refers to as selling a bundle, and to accomplish this, he offers customers an incentive. When customers buy a Car Kitool Original 1.0 and an Emergency Charger 1.0 or 2.0, they receive a shock-resistant case and screen protector for free. Car Kitool offers two different kinds of screen protectors, one with a reflective surface that serves as a mirror. “Women think this is really cool,” says Elbaz. The other has a focus on reducing glare and smudges such as fingerprints. Both protectors, designed for iPhones, promise simple installation with no bubbles. The magic of demo The products are important, there’s no doubt. But what sells the Car Kitool is the demonstration system, says Elbaz. For the Car Kitool demo to be effective, retailers need a demo box that has a receiver with two speakers. This demo box, supplied by Car Kitool, performs the same function as a cigarette lighter in a car. The Car Kitool Original 1.0 demonstration takes a total of three minutes. Demonstrators use customers’ own cell phones, showing them the ease of making a call, playing music and using a GPS, while simultaneously charging their phone and an additional one. Retailers conduct actual phone calls to show customers the clarity of hands-free talking. The demo resembles a magic show, as demonstrators slip the customer’s cell phone into the Original 1.0 and say, “One, two, three …,” and then, Poof!, customers hear their own music over the speakers. Once the Original 1.0 demonstration has concluded, the retailer moves on to show how the emergency charger works. And after that? The shock-resistant cases. “We slam our iPhone,” says Elbaz, who recommends retailers have a working iPhone on the cart for these demonstrations, or an iTouch, a cheaper version. Shock-resistant cases are rubberized and reinforced with hard plastic to ensure durability, providing strong protection against scratches. The bottom line: “If you just put out the items… you’re not going to get the results,” says Elbaz. Start your engines Retailers deciding to sign on with Car Kitool have two options. The first is to add Car Kitool products to their current assortment of cell phone accessories. In this scenario, start-up costs hover around $5,000. The second is by setting up a Car Kitool concept cart, retailing Car Kitool Original 1.0′s, Car Kitool Emergency Chargers 1.0 and 2.0, Car Kitool Shock-Resistant Cases, Car Kitool Screen Protectors and Car Kitool Headsets. In this scenario, start-up costs average $20,000, including the demo box. Demo boxes purchased on their own cost between $300-$500, and can be custom-made to color and size specifications. Full support and training is offered to retailers regardless of the option they choose. Training at their Las Vegas headquarters is free of charge. If on-site training is preferred, there is a fee that varies depending on the location. For retailers who simply want to learn better sales techniques, such as effective demo speeches, “We could even do a phone training,” says Elbaz. Elbaz assists retailers with site selection, as well. Due to his prior specialty retail experience, he has worked with many shopping center developers, including Westfield and General Growth Properties, Inc. Car Kitool products work well in just about any shopping center and demographic, says Elbaz. However, tourist areas, airports, and in general, busy malls do especially well, because Car Kitool products service the customer on-the-go who doesn’t have enough time to charge his or her phone, or isn’t even home enough to do so. But, as Elbaz is quick to point out, with features enabling users to play their own music in their car, and protectors and cases for those who simply want to protect their phone—there’s something for the whole family. As for merchandising guidelines on the RMUs themselves, Elbaz suggests retailers have two prominently placed plasma screens that show the Car Kitool products in use, one on each side of the cart, to grab the attention of those passing through the common area. One screen is also an option, or even none, if a retailer doesn’t have enough money in his budget. In this case, Elbaz offers “a layout with a (graphic) sphere design in the middle (of the unit) and slat walls on the side,” he says. With or without plasma screens, the cart should be simple and easy to scan. If selling Swarovski crystals, retailers need glass display cases that can be locked up, due to their pricepoints. But perhaps the best measure of support is the fact that the company stands behind all of its products. Each and every one comes with a one-year warranty and a toll-free number for customers and retailers to use. “We offer a one-year warranty on the crystals too. Every time you sell one of the cases, customers automatically ask, ‘How much is it?,’ and the next question is always, ‘What happens if a crystal falls off?’,” says Elbaz. “If customers don’t live in the area, they can send us the case and we will repair it and send it back,” he adds. Customers are encouraged to keep their receipt for this reason. Unveiling the future As this article goes to press, Elbaz finalizes the details of all he aims to accomplish. For starters, he would like to combine the Car Kitool Original 1.0 and Emergency Charger into one kit, to sell as a set, and introduce additional Car Kitool Original sets. The point is: If there’s a problem without a solution, or a way to make it better, Elbaz is working on it. “Car Kitool has opened my eyes to a bigger vision,” Elbaz says, “I have huge goals and I intend to fulfill them.” Mouse over images below to view.